Manufacturing the Goods of TomorrowManufacturing the Goods of Tomorrow


About Me

Manufacturing the Goods of Tomorrow

Hello, my name is Eric and this is my industrial and manufacturing blog. So many people seem to sit around using amazing products without stopping to think about where they came from. I know this because I used to be one of those people. However, all that changed when I visited my friend Steve. He is the general manager of a company which produces all kinds of cool goods. Steve invited me to his factory and production plant and I spent a few days there hanging out and learning all kinds of cool stuff. Since then I have been learning all I can about this topic.

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Two Ways That Industrial Manufacturers Can Prevent Their Finished Products From Being Damaged

It is extremely important for those who run industrial manufacturing businesses to ensure that the products they make reach their customers in perfect condition, as any damage to these items could have a serious impact on their enterprises' profits and reputation.

Here are two ways that manufacturers can prevent their products from sustaining damage when being delivered to their customers.

Invest in custom-made boxes

The boxes in which a manufacturer's products are placed before being sent off to their customers can play a determining role in whether or not those products arrive at their final destination in one piece.

If, for example, a specific product is extremely heavy and is placed into a standard, single-walled cardboard box, the box itself will most likely not be able to withstand the weight of the item inside it. This could result in the box collapsing whilst it is being loaded into or out of the delivery van, and the product inside it subsequently falling to the ground and breaking.

Likewise, if a product has an irregular shape and is placed into a square-shaped box, there will be too much space inside the box in certain areas. This could result in the object inside being flung around inside the box whilst it is in the moving delivery van. This could, in turn, lead to it sustaining damage.

As such, if a manufacturer wants to minimise the risk of their products being broken, they should use custom-made boxes, which are designed to suit the weight and the shape of the products that they will hold. Whilst these may cost more than generic boxes, they could actually save a manufacturer a lot of money in the long run by preventing their products from being damaged whilst in transit. 

Make sure the delivery vehicles are suitable for the items they will be transporting

The vehicles in which a manufacturer's products are transported to their customers can also have an impact on whether or not these items sustain damage during the delivery process.

For example, if a manufacturer makes perishable products (such as fresh food or temperature-sensitive medications), and they use refrigerated vans to deliver these goods to their customers, they should make sure that the temperature-control systems within the vehicles' storage containers have an auto-adjustment feature, which temporarily raises the temperature each time the storage container's doors are opened so that the warm air that enters the container does not spoil the perishable goods inside.

Without this feature, the rise in temperature caused by the warm air outside seeping into the back of the vehicle could result in the growth of pathogens on the products (particularly if the van's doors are kept open for more than a few minutes on a hot day).